2nd of November: Record-Breaker

There’s good news, and there’s bad news. The good news is that there is no way you won’t find something in this week’s list that interests you. The bad news is that that’s because there are fifty-odd links today. I’m not sure why I all of a sudden started reading so much, especially as this was the week in which I downloaded an app to shame me into reading more books and frittering away less of my time. Oh well.

This was also the week in which Taylor Swift’s 1989 was released on iTunes, which is such an unwieldy piece of software that I was late to class because of it. Also because I don’t care, admittedly. However, I will not burden you all with a song off it as that’d be too obvious – I’ve already got about a dozen articles about it down the bottom of the list.

Song of the week is, just because I’m listening to it at the moment and having a bit of a nostalgic moment, November Rain. Watching the video while listening is compulsory.

Long, over-indulgent song, in an over-long intro, for an over-long blog? Brilliant.

I wrote a thing this week! Not NATO Council anymore, but I wrote up a talk by Professor Keohane I attended at the LSE.

  • Good look at how ISIS exploits tribal divisons

  • This piece on Obama administration diplomacy re: Iraq has some great little anecdotes

  • Even though I find the media’s fetishization of them a bit odd, this is a great feature (FR) on the female Kurdish militias

  • An overview of external interventions in Libya recently

  • Strong argument (FR) against “political solutions” to terrorism

  • Dan Drezner tries to understand the latest outbreak of US-Israeli (hilarious) pettiness

  • Examination of lone-wolf terrorism

  • Review of a damning book on the conduct of the war in Afghanistan.

  • Dilma won, and the Brazilian right are already trying to get her impeached. A look at why the election was so divisive, and an explanation of why she won. Also, some general interesting observations on the election.

  • Good piece on how the “Churchill” model of leadership haunts British politics

  • Fascinating look at how broadly black identity was defined in the UK. Sort of writing I only really see coming from the States, would love recommendations of UK-centric stuff.

  • Philippe Marlière tackles the myth of British generosity to asylum seekers

  • Speaking of which, a great (slightly old now) feature on the seat Nigel Farage is going to target at the next election

  • Also from the LRB, this is a really interesting history of Islam by Tariq Ali, introduced by a beautiful little autobiographical tale

  • A look at the future for Burkina Faso from Al Jazeera and Africa is a Country, as well as this delightfully pointed letter (FR) from President Hollande to (now-ex) President Compaoré

  • Almost dystopian (Kelsey Atherton compared it to Warhammer 40K when he shared it) but fascinating feature, touching on so many problems, piece on Californian prisoners working as volunteer firefighters.

  • An optimistic piece on Ebola? Surely not.

  • Very interesting interview about rethinking the way we design cities, taking, but of course, Latin America as an example

  • Terrifying piece (FR) on Boko Haram’s latest attack

  • This is a long, moving, intelligent, thoughtful, upsetting essay on dealing with grief – I had to read it in several sittings both because of the length and the subject matter but I highly recommend making the effort

  • Sober reaction to the Virgin Galactic crash Friday

  • Beautiful little piece on Egypt’s revolution

  • What is dehumanisation, and how does it enable atrocities?

  • I had assumed this sort of thing was an algorithm – turns out there are poorly-paid people dealing with ‘reported’ content on social media.

  • Long feature on how Louisiana is fading into the sea and the political, environmental, and cartographical implications of this

  • Two on abuse of women online – one an account, and the other a call to stand up to trolls

  • Very good feature on how China is causing concern in the Asia-Pacific region.

  • This is funny on ‘The Secret Fantasies of Adults’

  • Also funny but kind of not on the pictures used to illustrate overpopulation stories

  • Surreal feature on ‘Uber but for not-quite-escorts’

  • ICYMI, J.K. Rowling wrote a thing about Umbridge. The bit beneath where she explains where the character came from is more interesting TBH. Mostly sharing because it reminded me of “’The ministry has fallen. Scrimgeour is dead. They are coming.”, ie the best quote in the whole series.

  • The Chuckle Brothers are having a moment and it’s amazing
  • This game looks fascinating but horrific – great review

  • Still haven’t played Metal Gear Solid 3 but this is such a great piece anyway

  • Very interesting look at different treatments of sex in RPGs

  • Proof that Gamergate (ugh) is winning – Anita Sarkeesian got invited onto The Colbert Report. Performs very well, too.

  • Right, we’re approaching the Taylor Swift segment. This is technically a Swift piece but I think it’s broaderly [sic] relevant on how we dismiss music without understanding where it’s coming from.

  • Here goes *deep breath*. Jezebel on how dude-heavy reviews of 1989 have been. Reviews from NPR, Vulture, Grantland, The Guardian* . Review from Slate is actually very interesting despite a stupid gimmick. Delightfully keen ‘conversation‘ on 1989. On Swift’s persona. On her use of social media**. This is on Red but it’s interesting. Vox did a cool live-blog (dude-heavy). The Guardian did a roundup of pieces on it, some of which I may not have linked to (doubtful). And… *exhale*

That’s all! Just under the thousand-word-mark. Have a lovely week. x

*though not a fan of the dig at Lana

**which is undeniably skilful but I’m actually finding quite annoying – my Tumblr is now even more adolescent than it was when I just followed my sister on there

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