March 1st: Late Lunch

Long one this week, and I’m starting late, so let’s get right to it.

As ever, this reading list is available in two formats – blog or newsletter. If you’d prefer it in the other one, click on the appropriate link.

Went back and forth on the song for a while, but I think, especially as there’s a great article on it later, it’s going to have to be Know Yourself off Drake’s new album, which I’ve listened to about five times and am still sort of shrugging at. This song gets v. good though.

 

  • Lot of grim Syria pieces to kick us off this week. A report from Raqqa, capital of the Islamic State. A very good summary of how bleak the country’s future is – I’m going to pull out the very effective structuring device into the footnotes* – you should read it though. On the bright side, this profile of volunteer rescuers in Syria, and the people who are already planning the reconstruction of Aleppo.
  • The bar for a nuclear deal with Iran is being lowered. This article is good on some of the political-sciencey bargaining lessons, and this one makes the good point that the many, many critics of the negotiations don’t really have a plausible alternative.
  • Very good essay on the historical illiteracy of calls for a Muslim Enlightenment. Some properly lovely history in here.
  • This is going back to that “What ISIS really wants” piece from last week, but I thought it was a very good look at how the debate unfolded.
  • A detailed look at how many fighters ISIS has, and a critical look at its infamous social-media power.
  • Surreal report on Turkey’s incursion into Syria this week.
  • Some properly nasty reactions to the girls (literal children) who are thought to have travelled to Syria – there are very good critiques here, and here.
  • Jihadi John got “unmasked” this week. The debate on what pushed him to Syria unfolded predictably, but these are good – criticism of security services’ conduct here, but a strong critique of CAGE’s report** by Shashank Joshi, who I basically trust.  Meanwhile, the War Nerd, who I’m a bit wary of these days, has a decent piece on it. IDK it’s complicated innit.
  • This is utterly bizarre – the FBI and the Pentagon’s plan to defend Alaska in the event of a Soviet invasion.
  • Speaking of Russian invasions (heyo) – this is good on what happens if/when the Ukraine cease-fire collapses. And this makes a really interesting point – even if Putin weren’t an absolute knob, the last ten-fifteen years probably wouldn’t have looked enormously different. Troubling look at the militias fighting for Kiev, but not necessarily under their control. And this, on how justified Kremlinphobia merges into basically racism and is then appropriated by the Kremlin to defend itself, is very insightful.
  • This is funny and a bit depressing. Someone on Twitter looked through minor celebrities’ responses to the London riots – Michael Owen’s is bizarre and grim.
  • This happens a lot – senior American officials, who happen to be women, say the same things their male colleagues say, and get gendered ridicule for it.
  • Meanwhile, in response to Joe Biden (there’s an incredibly creepy photoset of him in that link), this is a troubling*** article on overly touchy blokes
  • Great essay on Islam and practicing faith independently and belief and I’ve been trying to write this one for two minutes so just go read it
  • Some interesting theorizing of what social media platforms permit and discourage
  • Really, really nice essay/short story/thing that you should read, on love? Again, trying and failing to describe it, go read it anyway.
  • Very good by Zoe Williams on how cruel policies that target the obese poor miss the point
  • This is cool in a nerdy way – why the medieval knight on horseback wasn’t the dominant force he was thought to be
  • Interesting on attempts to move beyond Fairtrade as a model****
  • Desperate last-ditch solutions for climate change would have grim side-effects but IDK this piece gives a bit too much weight to “it’d be sad if we couldn’t see the stars” which yes, but so would all of us burning and dying so idk.
  • Really good article on sex workers’ rights in Brazil
  • I read this short story on the bus and I almost had to just sit in the street and finish it and process it because I was shaken for about five minutes. Takes a sharp left turn and it’s just very good.
  • Joel Golby is very good on what happens after you graduate – I’m about four months away from what sounds bleak.
  • Funny in defence of holidays in term-time
  • This is one of those really good no-bullshit articles on fitness, with a focus on how misleading solutions are marketed to women.
  • Really cool look at how what is, in theory, a public walk along the Thames, is enclosed and fenced off and denied to the public
  • Critique of Mars One
  • Two really good pieces on the Two and a Half Men finale which sounds absolutely weird, and a great article on actually good TV, but why there’s never been another Friends
  • Funny on the crap advice future parents get
  • Here’s what I promised – really good review of Drake’s new album by Rembert Browne, along with the undisputed best thing to come out of said album in the form of this Vine.
  • Noel Gallagher took on Beyoncé, which, lol. Pete Paphides sorts him out.
  • Really interesting on how class still affects dating, and a great case for Tinder as a tool for later-in-life dating
  • Beautiful essay from an author who has learned he has terminal cancer
  • Very interesting on how Kendrick Lamar’s faith comes across in his music
  • This is quite nice on ‘drinking books’
  • This is funny.
  • And, because two days in, I’m already deeply sick of people talking about House of Cards, this review of the second season confirmed that I was right to give up on it.

Christ that was a long one. Plenty to be getting on with, off you go. x

Apparently, the solution to my gender problem was just adding vast amounts of articles to the mix – up to 36% this week. 

*“No political solution to the conflict in sight, and the suffering inside Syria is getting worse No place to escape as borders to neighbouring countries close and animosity is rising toward refugees in host communities. Hostility is also growing in Europe and rescue at sea is being phased out. Funding for humanitarian organizations is flagging and more than 50% of Syrian refugee children are out of school. There are rising numbers of struggling refugee women and a generation of stateless children is being created.”

**which I haven’t read, it’s knocking about in my queue somewhere

***mostly because I think I’ve been all of the types here at one point or another

****though it does give a bit too much of a platform to irritating hipster coffee shop owners

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