October 5th: Exit Polls

Longest ever break, that – we just skipped, I think, two weeks? I very nearly missed today, not through lack of internet so much as wanting to play more Far Cry 2. Couldn’t even write it at 4 in the morning like I used to as I was up at the crack of dawn to trek (quick and empty bus almost directly from home) to queue up (there was no queue) at the Brazilian embassy all day (I was out in 15 minutes). So that was exciting – certainly the most significant election I’ve ever voted in.

Anyway, I have now settled into the flat, but not into the rhythms of actually studying. My Pocket queue has gotten absurd, as whenever I do read it’s for tedious university stuff, so we’ll see how much there is to share every week, but for now, I’ll stay with the same system. Meanwhile, there’s a veritable glut of links to be getting on with this week, so I’ll get straight (says he, 165 words in) to it!

Weekly-ish reminder that if you’d rather receive this direct to your inbox instead of hassling ALL THE WAY to click the link yourselves, you can subscribe here

Song of the week is hardly a secret, but I’ve listened to it about seven times in the past 24 hours. We watched Bridget Jones again this week* and then it came on at a house party and jumped into my gym playlist – it’s Chaka Khan’s “I’m Every Woman”.

 

First up, a couple of my NATO Council pieces dropped out of the system while I was away. This was supposed to come before the piece on India’s submarines (as evidenced by the transitional bits all over it), on Brazil’s own programme, while this, when I wrote it, was a reasonably topical look at France finally deciding to suspend the sale of the Mistral-class warships to Russia.

  • Naturally, it’s an ISIS-heavy list. The problem is, I’ve read so much on ISIS these past weeks that it’s all blurred into one. If it’s made it into the list, I think it’s good, and there are some that have stuck in my mind, like this overall look at Middle-East politics by Andrew Bacevich or this meditation on how hysteria has developed over ISIS, or this anatomy of mission creep. Otherwise, it’s just one, two, three, four, five pieces on ISIS that are all worth reading if you’re interested but broadly indistinct.
  • Lovely, bittersweet piece on how Odessa and its residents have been affected by the past year’s events in Ukraine
  • On a similar topic, I’ve not liked much leftist writing on Ukraine, as most of it seems about as sophisticated as the rant I got off the hippie who drove me to Madrid, but even though I don’t agree 100%, this is a really good critique of the West’s role in the crisis (without degenerating into The Nation-esque apologetics)
  • Also, good rebuttal of abusing recent events to fit them into a ‘clash of civilizations’ framework
  • A few good pieces on today’s presidential election in Brazil – one impressed by Marina Silva, one less so (Pt.), and a profile of Dilma Rousseff.
  • Sad profile of some of the campaigning mothers who have lost children to police violence in Brazil
  • In more positive news, this recognition of a quilombo community’s right to its land in Rio is a very interesting and encouraging sign – more context on the quilombos’ campaign here
  • Again, a bit late but this is quite good on what would have happened to the respective militaries had Scotland left the union – does nothing to dispel my belief that we could have reannexed them if necessary
  • Encouraging reminder that sometimes international climate efforts work – the ozone got better
  • Corrective to the idea of China as a “lonely diva”
  • A reflection on R2P
  • You can always count on Jay Ulfeldler for some well-sourced optimism – this on the “end” of the era of democratisation is good
  • Examination of what happened when Britain de facto secretly decriminalised cannabis (nothing good)
  • Mostly obvious stuff but some quite interesting bits and pieces from an informal experiment replicating Tinder
  • Powerful column on street harrassment**
  • 100% here for writers taking Kim Kardashian seriously
  • Two plane articles. One which will make you never want to fly EasyJet again because you know how the other half live. One, long, horrifying, dripping with tension, which will make you never want to fly again because you know that, basically, humans weren’t meant to fly.
  • Good response to a column on the “death of masculinity” in television (I didn’t read the original because I don’t like to waste free clicks on paywalled sites on hatereads, but this response stands alone).
  • Oliver Burkeman turns his guns on empathy
  • This is lovely on being a Sikh woman in business
  • As if #gamergate (ugh) wasn’t already enough of a nasty, sad, pathetic “movement”, it’s chief British supporters are the terrible Milo Yiannopoulos, and James bloody Delingpole, who is once again shown to be a troll by the devious trick of comparing his articles with each other. All it needs is for Toby Young to lend his support and it’d be a collection of the worst humans.
  • Finally, I loved this two-part examination of alliances in The Lord of the Rings films and its attempt to draw real-world lessons from the Battle of Helm’s Deep***.

 

 

 

  • * Which reminds me – I watched it with a friend who loathes the series, while I really like it, but I was wondering – are they explicitly, textually anti-feminist? Not the character of Bridget herself, which is where most criticism pointlessly goes, but the intention – I mostly noticed the negative portrayal of the ambitious lawyer lady, as well as the straw-feminist that is her sweary mate. IDK. Still love the films.**though it is a baffling haircut

    ***One minor quibble though – I’m pretty sure the elven reinforcements in The Two Towers come from Lothlorien not Rivendell, which mildly undercuts her point about overcoming isolationism. *adjusts spectacles*

27th of July: Straight outta Skipton

I’m writing to you from a tiny village in Yorkshire (a proper one shop, two pubs place), showing you just how committed I am – from Spain to the provinces, I never fail to bring you the best reading the internet had to offer this week.

This week’s song is Kendrick Lamar’s “Real”. It’s a great song in itself, but comes at the end of an incredible run of songs in the middle of Good Kid M.A.A.D City, an album which took me five or six listens to actually appreciate once I had gotten over the hype, and now I listen to the songs from “m.A.A.d City” to “Real” all the time, so listen to this one, then those four, then the album.

Before I get into it, an announcement. Inspired by Kelsey Atherton (excellent for tech and especially drones), and Jamelle Bouie (lovely photos, recipes and brilliant writing on race), I’m starting a newsletter version of this series. Basically, if you’d rather receive the Reading List to your inbox every Sunday instead of seeking it out here, just click on the following link to subscribe!

  • First up, this week’s NATO Council piece was on the new British aircraft carrier, the HMS Queen Elizabeth. Unsurprisingly, the project has been a joke.
  • Speaking of absurd ship-building projects, here are three articles on France’s sale of Mistral-class amphibious ships to everyone’s favourite autocrat. One demanding they cancel the sale, one explaining why it’s not that easy, and one offering an alternative.
  • And while we’re talking about EU sanctions, this explainer from Vox on why the EU reaction to Putin has been so seemingly toothless strikes me as having a lot of truth to it.
  • Last week, posted a thing about Srebrenica – this by Stephen Saideman on the recent Dutch ruling that it was partly liable for the massacres, and the consequences for future peacekeeping operations, is interesting
  • Provocative argument: it’s time for the USA to let Iran deal with the mess that is Iraq, given their part in further destabilising it after the US smashed it up.
  • Avoiding posting any Israel/Palestine stuff because it’s depressing and may already have torpedoed a job interview for me this week, but this piece on writing about the Middle East is really well-written and thought-provoking, regardless of the rest.
  • Further writing on the BRICS Development Bank announcement from last week – will it fund coal plants? And will that be such a bad thing?
  • Properly brilliant piece on Brazil in the wake of the Cup.
  • Cord Jefferson excellent as ever on male entitlement to women’s affection
  • Interesting discussion of how we define “public”
  • This discussion/list of advice for writers and journalists of colour is valuable even to white non-writers like me for a variety of reasons. First, some of the advice is universally applicable. Second, no matter how much I read about discrimination and stuff, it’s still an eye-opener to see the different adversities people have to overcome. Finally, it’s good to be aware of the specific struggles people go through in an area to see if there’s a way to alleviate them.
  • About to start the second season of the excellent Orange is the New Black*, so this was relevant. This feature by the real-life Larry (Chapman) Kernan is really interesting, both on the experience of the outside-prison partner, and on the experience of being made into a TV series.

And that’s it! Have a lovely week, all x

*seriously fucking good. I might write something about it once I’m done, though I’m wary of pontificating too much on a TV series refreshingly centred on the perspectives of people who aren’t middle-class white guys like me (related to the penultimate link in the list). Still. Relentlessly humanising, critical without preaching, funny, sexy, heartbreaking stuff. Go watch it.